Neurotica

Using form and colour to provoke a viewer into a reaction. I suppose that describes all artworks. Now that we are surrounded by the A.I. and its brilliance, I am wondering with all my work, how many words would the A.I. need to make this. What would you say in a sentence to get this image. If my name or page are used as a prompt, would that be copyright infringement?

‘Neurotica XXX’, 21″ X 35″, oil on canvas, 1997/98. This is number 30 of this ongoing series, mostly now in pencil or inks. I would love to turn them all into giant oil on canvas paintings, but that would require a lot of money, mainly to find space big enough that I don’t get injured again from the chemical fumes. It took months to get the smell of linseed oil out of my tiny studio apartment. But I still prefer working in oils. You can get effects like airbrushing using just a regular brush, dry brush effects and the like.

Obsession

‘Ponder Too’, 36″ X 72″, oil on paper, 1996. A sure sign of an obsession of some kind, giant heads maybe, flexible giant heads. Much more it was the first steps after Bedlam Gallery closed, really pondering what to do next, why do I have another studio, I have no money etc. etc. But I was determined to stuff my genius into your heads,like it or not. I was working on the ‘neurotica’ series prior to these, quite a different method,I wanted to mold the heads into a twisted organic single head.This was an example of going to the nth degree with an idea. I wanted to make them even bigger, 20 or 30 feet would be good. At the time I had lots of paint, enough to use a plastering trowel to paint with oils, but the canvas was out of my budget, so paper and scrap wood worked fine. Also to store the idea, artists would know this, like a sketch but enough to stand alone.

The three ponderings for scale. Imagine them on forty foot canvases in the atrium of the giant bank where they have the golden toilet seats stored.

Pondering

‘Pondering’, 32″ X 43″, oil on wooden skid with a large palette knife and brush, 1996. Thinking about the next brushstroke can take more time than making it. This painting is within the Domesticated series of paintings.This is a very heavy painting, not just the wooden skid but the volume of paint and plaster and things.

In detail.

The back of the painting.

Change Machine

An image that I should leave untitled, it was another outburst of maniacal distortions, not a chance to have a thought before hand, but I am always tempted as my mood changes and I see the effect the title might have on the viewer. Preferably at a live art show, its always the best to see them in person. This piece is 20 years old at least.

‘Entropy’, 24″ X 24″, oil on canvas, 2003. I also named it ‘Stuffed in a Box’, when I was feeling more confined spatially. And Change Machine. Entropy: Within a closed system, like a box, or the universe, entropy will increase. Entropy being the measurement of disorder. It is the second law of thermodynamics. All we can do is slow it down for ourselves locally by putting in energy, like painting pictures and such. I don’t know what you do. Maybe making shelter for everyone, something like that.

The background here is composed of a part of a branch of a tree in a drawing in the book called Entropy, The Art of Graham Houston….I tiled and squared it repeatedly until this appeared, something always appears.

We are all living inside a change machine, and the rate of change is increasing.